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Michigan Representative District 35

Choose one candidate. Representatives in the Michigan State House serve two-year terms and receive an annual salary of $71,685.

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  • Robert Brim
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Jeremy A. Moss
    (Dem)

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Biographical Information

How should the state assist other municipalities and school districts whose solvency is threatened by its financial obligations to current and future retirees?

Is the way the state funds our cities adequate to ensure safety and service delivery? If not, what changes would you support to our municipal finance model?

When cities are struggling, what is the appropriate way for the state to intervene? Should state intervention – through the emergency manager law or some other avenue – come with dollars attached? Why or why not?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the state’s response.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the federal government’s response.

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you believe Michigan’s tax system is generally fair? If not, what changes do you support?

Would you support the establishment of a Detroit Educational Commission that would have authority to site, open and close traditional public and charter schools?

What changes, if any, would you support in the way Michigan authorizes and regulates charter schools?

Do you favor amending the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity?

Do you support state-level laws modeled on the federal Restoration of Religious Freedom Act?

Have you signed any public pledge to support or oppose any organization’s public policy objectives, such as outlawing abortion or barring any increase in taxes?

Do you support legislation to minimize or eliminate the influence of political parties on drawing lines for legislative districts?

Do you support decriminalization of recreational marijuana?

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

Do you support the renewal and/or expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers?

Do we incarcerate too many people in Michigan? What would you change in the criminal justice system?

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City of residence Southfield, MI
Age 30
Education BA in Journalism and Political Science, Graduated with High Honors from MSU (2008); Studied Race Relations in South Africa (2007); Michigan Political Leadership Program Fellowship through MSU (2013)
Vehicles owned Jeep Cherokee Latitude
Professional Experience State Representative (2015 - present); Southfield City Councilman (2011-2014); District Director to State Rep. Rudy Hobbs (2011-2012); Political Aide to Southfield Mayor Brenda Lawrence (2008-2010); Legislative Aide to State Rep. Paul Condino (2005-2006, 2007)
Political Experience After serving a term on the Southfield City Council, I was elected to the Michigan House of Representatives from the 35th District, winning with 83 percent of the vote in 2014. I immediately stepped into leadership roles, becoming the highest-ranking Democrat on the House Local Government Committee and assistant floor leader for the Democratic Caucus.
Race/ethnicity White
Campaign Website http://votejeremymoss.com
Incumbent? true
To keep the financial obligations to Michigan’s public retirees, the state should follow the lead of the private sector to create a public pension guarantee system, to at least create a limited guarantee for public employees.

Ultimately, cities in our state are best served when state-shared revenues that fund city resources and services are predictable and consistent. The billions of dollars of cuts to communities in the last decade have created municipal hardships that extend beyond paying for legacy costs.
The way we fund our cities is not adequate. Out of 50 states, Michigan is the only one in which our local municipalities have less money to provide essential services than a decade ago. State support in Michigan to municipalities declined by 57 percent during that time period.

City, villages and townships in Michigan lost over $5.5 billion of that shared state funding from 1999 to 2016 – and $585 million in 2016 alone. That’s lost money to fund local road construction and public safety departments

That’s why I offered an amendment to the state budget that would boost revenue sharing to the 49 other states whose communities have enjoyed municipal revenue growth.
Yes, state intervention should come with appropriated funds.

Many of the financial problems in our local communities were derived from state funding cuts in the first place. In fact, of seven communities that were under emergency management, more than $870 million of state shared revenue had been stripped in the prior decade.

Boosting revenue sharing and ensuring that our struggling communities are properly funded would ease the burden on the state in the long term, not having to continue to takeover defunded communities and accelerating crises.
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The state accelerated this crises and yet Flint families that were drinking and showering in bottled water the day the Governor says he found out about the crisis in October of last year are still drinking and showering in bottled water today. There has been no movement to replace the lead water service lines - that’s an emergency response failure.
Poor
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The federal government has led the only real effort for accountability by calling on the Governor and Flint’s former emergency manager to testify before an oversight panel. The state balked at that chance and is more interested in deflecting blame and responsibility while inadequately funding solutions.
No.
No.
Michigan tax system is generally not fair and relies too much on Michigan’s vulnerable citizens to plug the holes in the state budget. I don’t believe that implementing a tax on retiree pensions in 2011 was appropriate to offset a business tax break. Tax revenue should deliver tangible results, and Michigan residents would like to see their taxes go toward rebuilding our roads and public infrastructure.
There must be local oversight to the placement of schools in a community. School property is exempt from local zoning laws and as a result, charter school placement is not cohesive to adjoining neighborhoods and traffic patterns. In addition, they can open up in competition next to traditional public schools – something a local zoning board considers even in the approval of private businesses site plans.

A Detroit Educational Commission would solve these problems in Detroit, but even more broadly, I support allowing local zoning authority over the placement of schools statewide.
A cap on charter schools is needed for two reasons. First, charter schools need the same state accountability and standards to produce academic achievement as public schools. Failing charter schools continue to operate with state support even though they haven’t proven to successfully educate Michigan students.

Second, a cap is needed to stop the infiltration of charter schools in areas that cannot handle them. Two thirds of Oakland County’s charter schools at one time were located in Southfield. City resources have been drained to monitor traffic twice a day during student drop-off and pick-up at locations in which the school district would never place public schools.
Yes. No one should be fired or evicted just because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Michigan is in a global war for talent and policies that open up the LGBT community to discrimination leave our state vulnerable on that battlefield.
Emphatically no. As an observant Jew, I know how out-of-context verses in the Old Testament can be abused as a license to discriminate under the guise of a “religious freedom” law. Let’s leave religious scripture and civil law separate as our country’s founders intended.
No.
Yes. I introduced legislation to improve the process of redistricting Michigan’s political districts by creating a nonpartisan commission that would oversee the drawing of political boundaries. In a healthy democracy, voters pick their elected representatives. Gerrymandering turns that on its head by allowing politicians to pick their voters. That’s not right, no matter which party is in charge.

The legislation I sponsored calls for the creation of a nonpartisan redistricting commission comprised of regular citizens who would be tasked with creating district maps that are not simply drawn to protect incumbents.
I’m not a proponent that intoxication and addiction are virtues, but I don’t believe marijuana usage is any more harmful than alcohol consumption. Before Michigan takes any approach toward reasonable decriminalization of marijuana, the state should examine what policies in other states are working or not working so that reform here can best serve the public good.
Yes.
Investing in renewable energy not only will limit the spread of air pollution and curb a leading cause of climate change, but will also provide an economic boost to create tens of thousands of jobs. We need to be competitive with our Midwest neighbors that have already adopted even higher standards than what is proposed in Michigan.
Violent offenders should be incarcerated and serving tough sentences. I do support alternative sentencing for non-violent offenders as each case merits to best place them on a path to rehabilitation. On the front-end, the state must invest in educational opportunities and support measures to reduce our unemployment rate so that young people can chart a productive life path.

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