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Michigan Representative District 6

Choose one candidate. Representatives in the Michigan State House serve two-year terms and receive an annual salary of $71,685.

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  • Candidate picture

    Stephanie L. Chang
    (Dem)

  • Attie Pollard
    (Rep)

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Biographical Information

How should the state assist other municipalities and school districts whose solvency is threatened by its financial obligations to current and future retirees?

Is the way the state funds our cities adequate to ensure safety and service delivery? If not, what changes would you support to our municipal finance model?

When cities are struggling, what is the appropriate way for the state to intervene? Should state intervention – through the emergency manager law or some other avenue – come with dollars attached? Why or why not?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the state’s response.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the federal government’s response.

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you believe Michigan’s tax system is generally fair? If not, what changes do you support?

Would you support the establishment of a Detroit Educational Commission that would have authority to site, open and close traditional public and charter schools?

What changes, if any, would you support in the way Michigan authorizes and regulates charter schools?

Do you favor amending the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity?

Do you support state-level laws modeled on the federal Restoration of Religious Freedom Act?

Have you signed any public pledge to support or oppose any organization’s public policy objectives, such as outlawing abortion or barring any increase in taxes?

Do you support legislation to minimize or eliminate the influence of political parties on drawing lines for legislative districts?

Do you support decriminalization of recreational marijuana?

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

Do you support the renewal and/or expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers?

Do we incarcerate too many people in Michigan? What would you change in the criminal justice system?

City of residence Detroit
Age 32
Family Sean Gray (husband), 11 month old daughter
Education University of Michigan, BA in Psychology and Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies - 2005 University of Michigan, MPP & MSW - 2014
Vehicles owned Ford Escape (2016)
Professional Experience State representative, MI House of Representatives (2014); Community engagement coordinator, James and Grace Boggs School (2013); Alumni engagement and evaluation coordinator, Center for Progressive Leadership in Michigan (2012-2013) Deputy director, Campaign for Justice (2007-2012) Coalition organizer for Michigan United/One United Michigan (2005-2006)
Political Experience Currently serving first term in the Michigan State House
Race/ethnicity Asian American/Taiwanese American
Incumbent? true
The state should start by adequately funding all of our districts and municipalities. Fully funding our statutory revenue sharing is critically needed. Obligations to those who spent a career working in public service or education must be taken seriously. Schools are losing funding via decreased enrollment of students, privatization of services, and loss of teachers to charter schools, which generally do not participate in MPSERS, exacerbating the revenue issue. Michigan should explore lowering the cap schools must pay from their foundation allowance, which would help to level the playing field between traditional public and charter schools.
The way the state funds our cities is not adequate at this time, which has resulted in critical losses to public safety and the delivery of public services. We need to do better for our cities, by fully funding our statutory revenue sharing to counties, cities, villages and townships, at least keeping up with the cost of inflation, and considering increasing this amount further. Repealing part of the $1.3 billion dollar tax cut to businesses passed in 2011 and investing it in revenue sharing would help our cities to deliver adequate public safety and services to residents.
I am opposed to the emergency manager law. There is a place for state intervention and state aid when a municipality or school district is struggling, but as both Flint and Detroit Public Schools have demonstrated, emergency managers seem focused only on the bottom line. We need another alternative to emergency managers – one that does not allow one person to unilaterally void existing contracts and collective bargaining agreements, and with checks and balances. Any alternative to the emergency manager law should ensure transparency and oversight, as well as a strong appeals process. Additionally, the state should also place an ombudsman to ensure that public concerns are considered.
Poor
Below average
Average
Above average
Excellent
We need a greater focus on environmental justice, changes at MDEQ, and changes to the EM law. My Flint colleagues and I introduced legislation that would re-establish citizen oversight commissions at MDEQ. A bipartisan water workgroup and I introduced 15 bills to address the water crisis in Michigan in late 2015. We need to invest more money to improve the infrastructure of the pipes and ensure that all Flint residents have access to adequate health facilities and programs, early childhood education programs, nutritious meals, social services, and other needs. In addition, the state should cover Flint water bills for the time period during which the Flint River was the water source.
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The EPA is responsible for overseeing MDEQ’s monitoring of water quality and did not react quickly enough when they saw lead level testing results. The federal government has been involved in the distribution of water and water filters, screenings, testing and more, as well as expanding Medicaid coverage for children and women. It was heartening to see Congress hold hearings on the Flint Water Crisis in a more timely fashion than our state legislature. The EPA should reduce the action level for lead and have stricter requirements for water sampling practices to make sure that lead levels are accurately measured. The federal government should provide more funding for infrastructure upgrades.
No.
No.
The 2011 changes to Michigan’s tax system have been unfair to seniors and working families. The increase in taxes to retirees and reduction to the EITC affected the most vulnerable in our communities, and least able to afford it. I would support reversing these changes, and sponsored HB 4922 which would institute a child tax credit. Businesses have been given tax cuts, which decreases state revenues and will result in a net loss to the state’s coffers soon. I support policies that prioritize our seniors and working families, not corporations. I support increasing the EITC and restoring the cuts to the homestead property tax credit. I support the concept of a graduated income tax.
I publicly supported the concept of a centralized coordinating body and the DEC in some form. I offered an amendment to add the commission to the House DPS plan when the package first came up for a floor vote. The amendment was gaveled down. I believe that immediately changing the way traditional public and charter schools are opened and sited is critical to stemming the tide of under-enrollment in DPS schools and the unchecked authorization of charter schools in our city. Some areas of Detroit are severely underserved, while others are saturated with options. This system must end for any other reforms to Detroit’s schools being enacted to have a chance a success.
There is a plethora of charter authorizers and not much in the way of regulation. I support changes that would end the practice of “authorizer shopping”, put penalties in place for authorizers who do not adequately address their substandard charter schools, prohibit the use of for-profit education management companies, and increase transparency of charter school spending and performance of each individual charter school. I support a certificate of need process so that charter schools open where community members and parents indicate there is a need for a new school. We should have stronger renewal standards to ensure that charter school contracts continue only when there is progress.
Yes. The Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act should protect all individuals, including the LGBT community, from discrimination. I cosponsored HB 4538, Rep. Hoadley’s legislation.
No. These proposals are about religious discrimination, which is unacceptable in all forms.
No.
Yes. Redistricting should be done in a fair, public, and non-partisan way. I support currently introduced legislation that would create a non-partisan public commission to perform re-districting.
Yes, but it is not a high priority issue for me. I also support cities in Michigan deciding this issue for themselves, rather than having the decision handed down from Lansing. I do support the continued regulation of the use of medical marijuana in Michigan approved by voters in 2008.
Yes and yes.
Yes, I support the expansion of the renewable portfolio standard. Moving away from coal-fired power plants and toward cleaner energy is critical to addressing climate change. Increasing our use of renewable energy will create jobs in Michigan and help to ensure cleaner air for years to come. I support Rep. Hovey-Wright’s House Bill 4518, which would increase the RPS to 20% by 2022.

Yes. I supported a bill that allows for release of medically frail prisoners who do not pose harm to their communities. I cosponsored the bill package to raise the age for youth to be considered adults in our justice system. My bill creates a Family Advisory Board within MDOC for families of those incarcerated to directly give input. I oppose privatization of services. We need to address the long lengths of time served by incarcerated individuals in Michigan. I cosponsored the presumptive parole legislation. We need to do a better job funding and enhancing reentry programs, which will address recidivism and ultimately lower corrections costs. We also need to restore good time credits.
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