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US Representative District 8

Choose one candidate to serve a two-year term in the U.S. House of Representatives. U.S. Representatives receive an annual salary of $174,000.

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  • Candidate picture

    Michael D. Bishop
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Jeremy Burgess
    (NLP)

  • Maria Green
    (Grn)

  • Candidate picture

    Suzanna Shkreli
    (Dem)

  • Jeff Wood
    (L)

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Biographical Information

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain.

Should Congress provide funding to help Flint, and other cities across the U.S., reduce and eventually eliminate lead service lines?

Do you support deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership? Do they help create jobs in the U.S.? Why or why not?

What do you think needs to be done to make the U.S. tax code fairer?

Do you think Obamacare should be augmented or replaced? How would you change it? What would you replace it with?

What specifically would you do to help colleges control the cost of tuition?

The U.S., and Michigan specifically, has long been a place of refuge for people displaced by wars and acts of terror. Should it remain so, especially with regard to refugees from Iraq, Syria and the Middle East?

Would you support a Constitutional amendment repealing Citizens United?

If an American auto company wants to open a plant in another country in order to reduce costs and increase its competitiveness worldwide, should it be able to do so? Should it have to pay additional taxes or fees for work performed overseas?

Where should the U.S. concentrate its job creation efforts?

Should the U.S. Senate confirm a Supreme Court Justice before a new president takes office? If not, why not?

What is the role of Congress when its majority sits in political opposition to the president?

Has the relationship between Congress and the president lost the respect it ought to have during the last two terms? If so, how would you restore it?

How effective has the Republican majority in the House been in exercising the House’s constitutional role in the federal government?

Do you believe income inequality is a problem in America? If so, what would you do about it?

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Racial inequality continues to be a serious problem in America.

If you agree, what would you do about it? If you disagree, explain why.

Do you support a moratorium on the deportation of undocumented immigrants whose children were born in the United States?

Do you favor the deportation of all undocumented immigrants?

Do you support legislation to reform the decennial redistricting process by placing it in the hands of in the hands of a non-partisan agency?

The following four questions are from the Livingston Daily Press & Argus: College tuition has spiraled to a point where generations of new graduates are likely to be saddled with massive debt through middle age and possibly beyond. This inhibits their ability to purchase homes, automobiles and other big ticket items necessary to drive the economy. With that in mind, name three concrete steps the federal government can undertake to ease the debt burden not only on current and future college students but also for the most recent past generation of graduates.

Obamacare has substantially decreased the number of U.S. citizens without health care coverage and eliminated denial of coverage for others with pre-existing conditions. Yet, health care costs continue to rise, burdening families and employers. Name at least one clearly defined step the federal government can take to keep health care costs from rising without causing the number of uninsured Americans to rise.

Since the Reagan Administration the federal government has been averse to raising taxes on the wealthiest one percent of Americans. Yet, that era has also seen their income rise dramatically while seeing middle class income decline and infrastructure deteriorate – perhaps best witnessed by the water crisis in Flint. Is it time to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans, invest in infrastructure and expand eligibility for programs benefiting middle and lower income Americans?

For the past quarter century the U.S. military has been engaged nearly continuously in the countries Middle East, either in combat or advisory roles, yet regional stability remains elusive. With regard to the current situation in Syria, it is time to expand, restrict, or refocus the U.S. presence and how would you pursue any of those options?

City of residence Rochester
Age 49
Family Wife - Cristina Children - Benjamin, Gabriella, Nathan
Education J.D. Michigan State University DCL (1993) B.A. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1989) Real Estate Brokers License - Curry Management Institute (1994)
Vehicles owned Buick Enclave GMC Terrain
Professional Experience Chief Legal Officer and General Counsel, International Bancard Corporation (March 2013- December 2014) Previous employment Senior Attorney, Clark Hill (2011-2012) President, Pro Management Company, LLC (1994-present) Adjunct Professor of Law, Thomas M. Cooley Law School (2011 - present) Senior Attorney, Simon Galasso & Frantz (2004-2010) Senior Attorney, Booth Patterson (1993-2004) Municipal Prosecuting Attorney, Booth Patterson (1994-1998)
Political Experience Michigan House of Representatives (1998-2002) Michigan State Senate (2003-2011) Michigan Senate Majority Leader (2006-2011)
Race/ethnicity Caucasian
Campaign Website http://electmikebishop.com
Incumbent? true
As I have stated before, Mr. Trump was not my first or second choice for the nomination. That being said, I will respect the voice of the voters and support the Republican nominee.
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It’s simply unacceptable that this could happen in our state, or anywhere in the U.S. for that matter. There were tremendous failures at the local, state and federal levels that denied the families of Flint clean drinking water. There’s no doubt the situation surrounding their water system should have be handled completely differently. But the bottom line is we need to fix this issue as soon as possible, and this responsibility cannot be taken lightly. The Michigan Congressional Delegation has worked together in a bi-partisan way and we will continue to collaborate on solutions for the people of Michigan.
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As I said above, it’s simply unacceptable that this could happen in our state, or anywhere in the U.S. Specifically at the federal level, the EPA FAILED in its responsibility to protect our citizens from this crisis.
Flint's crisis is not a Democrat or a Republican issue, which is why I joined the rest of the Michigan Congressional delegation in January to urge President Obama to support Governor Snyder's request for federal assistance. Going forward, I will carefully consider all requests for federal assistance, including legislation that has already been introduced, that will support state and local leaders and their efforts to ensure kids and families in the Flint area, and across the nation, have access to clean drinking water.
First, I support free and fair trade. As I discuss this agreement with my constituents, colleagues and business groups, I continue to hear a number of concerns about its impact on Michigan's 8th District. Before making any final decision, I will continue to review this agreement, and listen to my constituents, as the House moves towards considering TPP in the future.
Taxpayers deserve better. There is no question that our current tax system is broken. Since 1986 the tax code has grown by over 70,000 pages. Michiganders spend billions of dollars each year on tax lawyers, accountants, and other costs associated with tax compliance because the tax code is too long and too complex. Too much of our national income is currently being drained by complying with tax laws. We can make the tax code fairer by making it simpler and lower than what we have now.
Obamacare has been forced upon the American people;has been poorly implemented, and has not met the numerous promises the president made.Across our state Michigan families have lost their health insurance, cannot see their own doctors, and are paying more while getting less.I am committed to health care reforms that reduce costs and increases access.We need to eliminate frivolous lawsuits, increase the portability of insurance and protect those with pre-existing conditions.We need a framework so that small businesses and individuals can join together to negotiate for cheaper health care premiums.We should allow insurance companies to cross state lines to increase competition and lower costs.
Every child and family deserves to have access to a first class education. Unfortunately, the cost of attending college has steadily increased over the past several decades, making higher education difficult to achieve.Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act will allow Congress the opportunity to provide students – regardless of age, location, or background – access to higher education. Reauthorization will also serve as an opportunity to streamline the student loan repayment process and decrease loan default rates, as well as the taxpayers’ burden of having to shoulder the costs of defaulted loans.I am proud to have passed my first bill to extend the Perkins Loan program.
I am proud of the fact that Michigan has long been a welcome place for refugees from around the world.That said,during a House Judiciary Committee hearing with FBI Director James Comey last year,I inquired about the vetting of Syrian refugees who wish to enter the United States, specifically the state of Michigan.Director Comey responded that while the intelligence community has “gotten better at querying our holdings,” there is little to no data on many of their refugees–meaning the vetting process is not “risk-free”.For this reason,I believe the responsible course of action is to pause the resettlement of Syrian refugees until we can ensure they are receiving exhaustive security screenings
I respect the ruling in Citizens United held that our First Amendment right to Free Speech and freedom of association supersede the Federal Election Commission's regulations on donation limits. With that said, I understand and appreciate the concerns over our current campaign finance system and will carefully consider proposals to reform it.
I believe in free markets. I also believe that we need to reduce Washington’s costly regulatory roadblocks that create an undue burden on businesses large and small, increase compliance costs, kill jobs, and stifle economic growth in THIS country.
The last thing Michigan job creators need is additional taxes, spending and regulation. I believe executive overreach by an unchecked bureaucracy, a convoluted tax code, and years of runaway spending are negatively affecting businesses across Michigan.

I am committed to reducing the role of the federal government in the daily lives of Michiganders and allowing the comeback state to continue its growth and recovery without Washington's interference.
I agree with a large number of my colleagues in the House and Senate that Justice Scalia’s seat on the court should not be filed until after a new President is elected this fall. In fact, when he served in the Senate, Vice President Joe Biden agreed. In 1992 he said “The Senate Judiciary Committee should seriously consider not scheduling confirmation hearings on the nomination until after the political campaign season is over."
The role of Congress is set by our Constitution, not by whichever political party holds the White House or controls Congress. Article I, Section 8, of the United States Constitution gives exclusive authority to the Congress to enact laws. When Congress enacts a law, it is the responsibility of the President, through the executive branch, to FAITHFULLY implement and enforce it.
The President does not respect the constitutional powers of Congress and the constitutional limitations on the Presidency. I have talked to members of Congress from both parties and the President does a poor job communicating with Republicans and Democrats alike. We need a President who respects the constitutional roles of Congress and can communicate with Congress on a regular basis. Both of those things will help restore the relationship between the Executive and Legislative branches of government.
I believe the President’s executive overreach has obstructed the constitutional role of Congress to enact laws. The President’s executive overreach is continually draining taxpayer’s hard-earned wages and standing in the way of opportunity and growth. This is why I introduced the bipartisan Regulation Sensibility Through Oversight Restoration (RESTORE) Resolution, H. Con. Res. 67, with Congressman Collin Peterson (MN-07) to reassert the Constitution and return the exclusive law making process to Congress, instead of empowering unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats. This would help bringing accountability back to Congress and reassert its legislative power.
I want to see higher wages for all hardworking Americans.At the end of the day, job creation and higher wages are a product of economic growth, not Washington interference.The Office of the Federal Register estimates that federal agencies publish 2,500-4,500 regulations annually.Under the Obama Administration alone, 184 newly implemented regulations have cost the American people nearly $80 billion every year, and for every $1 billion in new regulatory costs, industry employment declined by 3.6 percent. As I said previously, when federal agencies impose these strict and sweeping rules, undue burden is placed on businesses large and small, increasing compliance costs, and killing jobs.
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We are a diverse country and equality is something we must always strive for. There should be no divide in equality of opportunity as it is at the essence of our free nation. It is important that all people have opportunity based on their talents and efforts regardless of their race. It is also important to support equal justice and I am proud to work with my colleagues on the Judiciary Committee to ensure every citizen has equal protection before the law.
It is evident that we have a broken system that undermines existing laws and threatens our national security. It is time to replace ineffective policies with real reforms. I believe we can and must do better to improve our legal immigration system for future generations. Our economy should continue to attract the best and brightest to remain competitive in the global market.I will not support any measure that threatens our national security or reduces our nation's critical border enforcement efforts. Instead, I will continue working to strengthen our border patrol and enhance immigration enforcement efforts across the country, while keeping America a welcome place for legal immigration.
As I said before, we must fix our broken immigration system and establish a strong, functioning immigration system, including a plan to address the 11 million undocumented people in our country in a humane way. Mass deportation and round ups are not a feasible or humane option.
Transparency in the process by which our Congressional districts are drawn must remain the #1 objective. I will review and consider any legislative proposal that seeks to improve this process.
The most important thing we can do to ease debt burdens is to get our economy moving again so every graduate can find a job. We can also enhance financial counseling for student borrowers and parents who are thinking about college - so they have all the information they need to make good decisions and not borrow more than they need or can afford. In addition, increasing student access to vocational training to help guide students to the career path that best suits them - instead of encouraging every student to obtain a 4 year degree, and undertake additional debt when unnecessary.
Obamacare has been forced upon the American people;has been poorly implemented, and has not met the numerous promises the president made.Across our state Michigan families have lost their health insurance, cannot see their own doctors, and are paying more while getting less.I am committed to health care reforms that reduce costs and increases access.We need to eliminate frivolous lawsuits, increase the portability of insurance and protect those with pre-existing conditions.We need a framework so that small businesses and individuals can join together to negotiate for cheaper health care premiums.We should allow insurance companies to cross state lines to increase competition and lower costs.
The best way to deal with slow income growth and a deteriorating infrastructure is to grow the overall economy and create more jobs. We can achieve this by creating a tax structure that is fair for all people, but it requires comprehensive tax reform. The current rate of growth is unacceptable and a complicated, archaic tax code is stifling our economy.
Middle East peace has been elusive and the issues will not be solved overnight. That being said, the Obama administration has lacked a coherent strategy to address ISIS and the crisis in Syria. There is no doubt that Assad used chemical weapons against his own people and President Obama did not address the situation in spite of his "red line." We must recalibrate our strategy to defeat ISIS and bring stability to the region. We can achieve this by better coordinating with our allies by supplying intelligence, materials and training. Most of all, we need to rebuild trust and respect.
City of residence Oxford, MI
Age 41
Family Daughter, 16 Son, 14
Education B.S. Biochemistry, Oakland University M.S. Chemistry, Oakland University
Vehicles owned 2014 Chevy Cruze, 2016 Chevy Trax
Professional Experience Automotive Research and Develpment
Political Experience None
Race/ethnicity White
Incumbent? false
No, I do not support my party's nominee for President of the United States and I will not appear at campaign event with him. One of the strengths of my campaign is that I am not obligated to follow a party platform and I am free to represent the people of the 8th district as is in their best interests and not the best interest of a political party. In a election year with so many questions surrounding the presidential candidates, I would have serious concerns with any candidate blindly supporting their party's nominee. This year you definitely want to elect a Representative to Congress who will go to work for the people and not blindly vote for all legislation that their party supports.
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It took far too long for the state to react to this crisis. They ignored the cries of the citizens that something was wrong instead of investigating their concerns. There was evidence of an issue with lead in the water and the state did not immediately take the proper action. This is the direct result of running government with a business-only mentality. Even from a business perspective this was not a smart move as the government did not do their due diligence and now will end up paying more as a result of this move. Short-sightedness and lack of planning caused the people of Flint to be poisoned. The people deserve better from their elected leaders.
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I would rate the federal government's response lower but the federal government cannot be expected to what is happening in every municipality in the country. The fact does remain though, that the EPA knew there was a high concentration of lead in the water and it took nearly six months before it took concrete steps to fix the issue. When rating the response of the government to the crisis, you need to only ask one question, and that is would the response have been the same if the issue was with the water in the White House and U.S. Capitol? To me, the answer is no, it would've been faster, and that is where the government failed the people.
I do feel that it is important to eliminate lead service lines, but I don't feel the funding should come from Congress. Local and state governments need to handle this burden.
I do support the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but I would not say I support all trade deals. I think they need to be evaluated on a case by case basis. In this case, Michigan exports a large amount of goods to the countries participating in this trade pact, and we do not have existing trade agreements with some of the countries in this pact such as Japan. I am pro-small business, and this deal will allow our Michigan small businesses to grow and create jobs.
It's not necessarily the tax code that I think needs to be drastically changed (simplified, yes), rather I feel the distribution of benefits from taxes needs to be distributed better. I do feel the top 1% should be taxed at a higher rate, but I also feel that my taxes should be used better. I don't mind my taxes going to help out other people in need, and I think the majority of Americans would agree with me on this, but I think the programs need to be fixed where they are given support to get back on their feet and better themselves and then the support ends. I think we need to see more people using programs to better themselves and less trying to live off these programs indefinitely.
I feel that Obamacare needs some tweaking. The first and most immediate tweak would be to increase the penalty for not having health insurance. While I am against requiring healthy Americans to have health insurance, the only way to keep costs affordable is to make sure that the insurance companies have a balance of high risk and low risk enrollees. People should not be allowed to wait until they get sick to sign up for insurance, and the increase in penalties would help convince people to sign up sooner rather than waiting until they need coverage. Other than that, there needs to be a constructive discussion in Congress between all parties to come up with a better long term solution.
I don’t feel that colleges need help to control the cost of tuition. Colleges can control their own costs by controlling their administrative costs. The costs aren’t rising because colleges are paying more for the professors, or the graduate assistants, who are educating the students. I think 4 year colleges need to be encouraged to keep their tuition costs low. This can be done by instituting programs informing students of the benefits of starting at a 2 year college and then transferring to a 4 year college. If the 4 year schools need to compete with more cost effective 2 year schools, I'm sure they'll find a way to better control their tuition costs.
While we still need to be open to taking refugees, we also need to push our allies in the region to bear a larger responsibility in accepting refugees and lessen our role. The countries in that region can have a direct affect on the politics and conflicts and if they had to bear the consequences of their action (or inaction) by accepting more refugees, I think it would make them be more proactive in trying to stop the wars and terror attacks.
Yes, I would support a constitutional amendment repealing Citizens United. We have got to get these large sums of money out of politics. If we don't, then you're talking about a system that will be designed to favor those with money over those without, and that is not what our country was founded on. Imagine what would happen if all the money spent on elections was instead put into education programs for our country or put towards fixing our infrastructure. Instead it is put towards making sure the laws favor the elite. This is wrong, and we need to change it.
I think it should be able to do so, but just because they are able to do so doesn't mean they should. It all depends on the value provided to the American people. If the design of the car is still being done in the U.S., then they are still supporting U.S. jobs. If the company becomes more competitive worldwide, and their sales increase, then it would mean more tax income for the country. While I do not like losing the manufacturing jobs, I've found that auto companies tend to make cheaper cars outside the country and higher end cars inside the country, therefore keeping the employment level. If they were to sell these cheaper cars in the U.S. saving citizens money, even better.
The U.S. should concentrate its job creation efforts in science and technology, skilled trades, and construction. We need energy sources that are alternatives to fossil fuels. We need to improve our infrastructure such as roads and bridges. We need to have more efficient public transportation. If we move forward with all of these, it will create jobs for all classes of Americans. This job creation would benefit those with education ranging from high school to trade school to university. This is what we need in America, job creation that benefits all Americans, not just one class or education level.
The U.S. Senate should begin confirmation proceedings regardless of whether it is an election year or not. If the Senate does not view the individual favorably, then they should reject the individual. Holding up the process is simply not fulfilling the requirements of their job, something that is becoming quite common in Congress when a party doesn't get their way. We need to move forward as a country, and to do that, we need our elected leaders to continue moving forward.
The role of Congress is the same regardless of what party controls the White House, and that is to represent the people of their district and to put a check on the power of the president. It does not serve the American people to block the initiatives of a president who is of a different party and to approve of the initiatives of a president who is the same party. Congress exists to put a check on the power of the president and ensure the voices of the people are heard. We have gotten away from this, and I want to bring this mentality back to Congress.
I believe the relationship between Congress and the president has lost the respect it should have. I would restore it because political party affiliation means nothing to me and I would be able to work with whomever is elected as the president regardless of political party. In Congress, I could be a voice that could be heard by either side of the aisle and help bridge the gap in political ideologies.
It has been at times very effective, and at others very ineffective. The core of the issue is that the Republican majority says no to anything President Obama supports. While this keeps bad policies from being implemented, it also keeps good ones from being implemented. The majority must learn that they are not there to work against the president or work for their party. They are there to work for the people of their district.
I do believe there is an income inequality problem in America. I'm not in favor of drastically increasing minimum wage, rather I think we need to provide programs so that people can improve their income situation, such as increasing student loans for 4 year colleges or trade schools. This will allow lower income families to start earning more, increasing the tax base. This increase in tax base will allow for continued support of these programs. Americans with the drive to improve their situation will have the opportunity to take advantage of this. If they don't have the drive, that is their choice. I was able to improve my situation in a similar manner, so it can be done.
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I think to solve racial inequality we need to take a look at our education system. We need to make sure that our schools have the teachers and resources they need in order to educate our children, regardless of their race. We need to give them every opportunity to succeed. We need to have tough conversations to understand how we can better get resources to underserved populations and commit to understanding one another in order to overcome racial boundaries.
Yes, I do. To remove those parents would place an undue burden on the state to find homes for the children as well as negatively affect the children at a young age. These children are American citizens and have the right to the best America has to offer them, and that includes having their parents here with them as they are growing up. I would not extend this after the children turn 18, and there would have to be discussion around this as you wouldn't want undocumented immigrants to feel they have to keep having children to stay in the country. Ultimately though, the rights of American citizens win out here, and as citizens, the children deserve to have their parents present.
For the most part, yes, but not all. As in the case of undocumented immigrants with children, that would be a scenario where I don't feel they should be deported. Aside from that and maybe some other extreme examples, these immigrants are here illegally and should be deported. I'm not in favor of mass roundups, but as law enforcement comes in contact with these immigrants they should be deported. The key to fixing our immigration problem is not to deport all the undocumented immigrants, but rather limit the jobs available to them by imposing stiffer penalties on those who employ them. Without jobs, there will be less incentive for undocumented immigrants to come here.
I would support the legislation. Gerrymandering is an issue that needs to be addressed. The political parties have too much control over elections and representation. They draw district maps to represent their own interests and not those of the citizens and a non-partisan agency, while not the most cost effective solution, would be the best solution to ensure that the will of the people is represented.
The first thing the government should do is work to ensure the interest rates on these current loans are lowered. While I don't believe in giving all Americans free education, and I'm willing to debate that with anyone who wishes to contact me about it, I do believe that the interest rates should be no more than 3% on these loans. Secondly, the government needs to set up a program encouraging students to start off a two-year colleges. This is the same education at a fraction of the cost of a 4 year college. After 2 years the student can then transfer to a 4 year college if desired. Finally, the government needs to creative a focus on trade programs as opposed to 4 year college programs.
The most immediate step that can be taken to lower health care costs and drop the number of uninsured Americans is to increase the penalty for not having health insurance. While I am against punishing Americans in this manner for what should be a choice, this is the most effective step to correct the most serious current issue with Obamacare. Insurers need younger, healthier Americans to obtain health insurance in order to keep costs down. This group of Americans have so far resisted, opting to pay for the lower cost penalty. If we raise the penalty, more people would enroll, lowering health care costs while also lowering the number of uninsured Americans.
We need to increase taxes on the wealthiest one percent. A small percentage increase in the taxes they pay will reflect a large amount of money that we could use to fix our infrastructure. I believe that we also need to invest that money in programs that will allow middle and lower income Americans to improve their income situation, such as college or trade school programs. This would allow them to not be dependent on these programs indefinitely, increase their income, and by increasing their income the increased tax revenue could then be used to further invest in these programs, creating a positive feedback cycle for income and economic growth.
We need to refocus the U.S. presence in this region into an advisory role. We need to leverage our relationships with our allies in the region to get more out of them. We are continually drawn into these conflicts in the Middle East with little support from our Middle Eastern allies. We need to negotiate better to get them involved. I have to believe that if our allies truly believe we were to step back which would possibly allow countries like Russia and Iran to be more involved, they would be willing to contribute more of their own resources as it would be in their interest to make sure these players do not become regional powers in the Middle East.
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City of residence Clarkston
Age 29
Family Single
Education Clarkston High School; Oakland University, B.A. in Political Science; Thomas M. Cooley Law School, J.D.
Vehicles owned Chrysler 300
Professional Experience Assistant Prosector, Macomb County (2011-2016)
Race/ethnicity Albanian
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The state's slow response to the Flint water crisis and lack of urgency fell well short of acceptable standards and did not reflect the gravity of the crisis. Even today, residents of Flint continue to deal with contaminated water. State officials must stay vigilant until every resident in Flint has access to safe drinking water and those impacted by the life-altering effects of this crisis have received adequate care and compensation. Additionally, those responsible for overseeing this disaster must be held accountable.

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The federal government needs to step up to the plate and provide much-needed funding to repair Flint's damaged water pipes. With some residents still drinking bottled water, it's unacceptable that nearly a year after this crisis came to light, Republicans in Congress continue to block funding to provide the residents of Flint with safe drinking water. This is a crisis that deserves national attention and a swift and robust response from the federal government.
Congress should make significant investments in infrastructure projects to eliminate lead service lines in Flint and other cities across the United States. Every person in the United States should have access to clean and safe drinking water. What happened in Flint is unacceptable, and we must take immediate steps to ensure that this disaster is not repeated in other cities.
Michigan, in particular, has suffered tremendous job and industry losses because of NAFTA, which cost more than 43,000 Michiganders their jobs. I do not support the Trans-Pacific Partnership because it would repeat the same mistakes. To date, Michigan has lost more than 214,000 jobs because of the United States’ trade deficit with countries that are part of the TPP agreement. Any trade deal passed by Congress must include safeguards for workers and wages, as well as health, safety, environmental, and human rights protections that our unions have fought for and that have made American manufacturing the best in the world.
We need a tax code that works for everyone, not just the wealthy and big corporations. Right now, we have a broken system where too many big corporations and the wealthy can avoid paying their fair share. In Congress, I'll level the playing field by cutting taxes for middle-class families and small business that create jobs, and closing corporate tax loopholes that give tax breaks to companies that ship our jobs overseas.

As a result of health care reform, more than 16 million Americans have gained health care coverage. The law was by no means perfect, and that's why we need to find ways to bring costs down for families and small businesses like my own; however, we cannot go back to a time when insurance companies were able to charge women more than men, canceled people's policies if they were sick, or denied health care coverage to those with pre-existing conditions. That is why I support improving upon current legislation by scrapping the "Cadillac Tax" on high-cost health plans and supporting small businesses by raising the current cap on what constitutes a small business to 50 employees.
Going to college shouldn't land our students in a mountain of debt that prevents them from starting a family or owning a home. As someone who is still paying off my student loans, I know firsthand the impact that the rising cost of tuition has on our students and families in Michigan. That is why I support lowering the burden of college tuition by letting students refinance their student loans at today's low-interest rates and expanding access to PELL Grants. Just as you refinance a mortgage or small business loan, students should be allowed to refinance student debt and lower their monthly payments to something they can afford.

The United States and Michigan should always remain a place of refuge for those in need. However, as a prosecutor who fights to keep dangerous individuals off the streets, I know that we also must make sure that we have a thorough and comprehensive screening process in place for any refugees coming into this country. We know that thousands of women and children are seeking safety from the unspeakable horrors facing them in Syria, but we cannot let terror organizations exploit any gaps to inflict harm on the United States. That is why we must have a process involving all of our counterterrorism assets to ensure that no terrorist can enter America under the guise of refugee status.
Yes. The Citizens United ruling puts more political power in the hands of the wealthy and has given big corporations far too much influence over our elections. Corporations and the wealthy shouldn't have a greater voice in our democracy than regular everyday Michiganders. It's time for Citizens United to go.

The auto industry is the driver of Michigan's economy. Many of my family members have worked their entire lives for the Big Three. It is critical that we protect the auto industry jobs we currently do have while also attracting investments that will create jobs in the future. To do so, we must level the playing field for employees here in Michigan by blocking trades deals that ignore currency manipulation, which hinders the auto companies' ability to make a profit.

The first thing we can do in Michigan to create jobs is to block unfair trade deals that ship our existing jobs overseas. That is why I oppose the Trans-Pacific Partnership and, in Congress, will fight for trade deals that are fair to American workers. As someone who grew up working in my family’s diner in Oakland County, I also know that small businesses are the lifeblood of our communities and have a vital role in our economic recovery. In Congress, I will work to keep taxes low for small business owners and cut back red tape and bureaucracy that makes it harder for entrepreneurs to create jobs.

The U.S. Senate should do their job and vote on the proposed Supreme Court Justice nominee to allow the Supreme Court to adequately do its job.

No matter who the president is or what political party is in the majority, it is the job of the representative from Michigan’s 8th Congressional District to fight for an agenda that moves Michigan’s middle-class families forward. In Congress, I’ll work across party lines to find common ground to create good-paying jobs, protect Social Security and Medicare for our seniors, and improve our schools for our students.

Across the political spectrum, we’ve seen a lack of decorum and respect at all levels. We see it every day with Donald Trump, who to date has mocked a disabled reporter, said he wants to “punish” women for making their own health care decision and insulted the Gold Star parents of a fallen soldier. This lack of leadership is why middle-class families are discouraged by what their representatives can accomplish in Washington. We need a representative who has the courage to stand up to both parties to make sure they are accountable to Michigan’s middle-class families.
There is certainly a reason why Congress’s approval ratings are at an all-time low. Its ability to legislate has been severely hindered by partisanship and dysfunction in the House of Representatives. As a prosecutor in the child protection unit, I take on tough fights every day to protect children from physical and sexual abuse. I get more done in one day in the courtroom than this Congress gets done in an entire session. I'm ready to take on the tough fights in Congress—and win for middle-class families here in Michigan.

Income inequality is certainly an issue that needs to be addressed. Our economy should be built to work for us all, not just the wealthy or big corporations. Here in Michigan, we can start by protecting the jobs we do have from being shipped overseas by opposing job-killing trade deals. Additionally, we need to raise the minimum wage. Wages have been stagnant for far too long, and it's long past due that we give our middle-class families a raise. And finally, we need to level the playing field for women and families by ending gender discrimination in pay.

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The discussion of racial inequality in America is an important conversation that is long overdue. In Congress, I will support efforts to remove barriers that prevent all American's from achieving prosperity, including reforming our criminal justice system and making significant investments in education to close the achievement gap.

Our current immigration system is broken. In Congress, I'll support policies that prevents families from being torn apart and brings undocumented workers out of the shadows to become productive members of our society, while also securing our border and upholding the rule of law.

No. I’m a first-generation American. My parents are Albanian immigrants who came to the United States legally in search of a better life. They started a small business in Oakland County and provided me the opportunity to get educated and start my career. I know firsthand the important role that immigrants play in our country. As a prosecutor, I also believe strongly in the rule of law. In Congress, I will work to fix our broken immigration system and pass bipartisan immigration reform that secures our border, provides a tough but fair path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the shadows, and prevents our neighbors and their families from being torn apart.
The redistricting process—especially here in Michigan—has become far too partisan. Future redistricting efforts should be led by a bipartisan and independent committee, which will help put an end to the practice of gerrymandering and strengthen our democracy.

As a product of Michigan's public schools and universities, and as someone who is still paying off their student loans, I know that we must make college and higher education more affordable for everyone who wants to earn a college degree. First, students should be able to refinance their student loans to lower their monthly payment to something they can afford. Second, we need to make community colleges and trade schools more accessible for those who want to improve their skills. And finally, in Congress, I'll expand Pell Grants to make college affordable and accessible for more students.

The Affordable Care Act was by no means perfect, and that's why we need to find ways to bring costs down for families and small businesses like my own; however, we cannot go back to a time when insurance companies were able to charge women more than men, canceled people's policies if they were sick, or denied health care coverage to those with pre-existing conditions. That is why I support improving upon the Affordable Care Act by scrapping the "Cadillac Tax" on high-cost health plans and supporting small businesses by raising the current cap on what constitutes a small business to 50 employees.
Investing in our aging infrastructure as well as investing in programs that help middle-class families in Michigan must be a top priority. We can pay for these investments by leveling the playing field and making sure the wealthy and big corporations are paying their fair share. In Congress, I'll do this by supporting common sense tax reform that cuts taxes for middle-class families and small businesses that create jobs, and closes corporate loopholes that give tax breaks to companies that ship our jobs overseas.

My top priority is keeping Americans safe. We must be tough and smart in dealing with ISIS, Al-Qaeda, and other terrorist groups. To do so, we need to work with our partners in the Middle East to bomb ISIS strongholds, support our allies on the ground and deny ISIS the resources it needs to grow. No one wants another protracted conflict in the Middle East, racking up more national debt and endangering the lives of our soldiers. That’s why our last resort should be to put more boots on the ground in the region. That said, we must consider all options when dealing with the growing threat of terrorism at home and abroad, and in ensuring the safety of U.S. citizens.
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