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Michigan Representative District 101

Choose one candidate. Representatives in the Michigan State House serve two-year terms and receive an annual salary of $71,685.

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  • Candidate picture

    Daniel C. Scripps
    (Dem)

  • Curt VanderWall
    (Rep)

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Biographical Information

How should the state assist other municipalities and school districts whose solvency is threatened by its financial obligations to current and future retirees?

Is the way the state funds our cities adequate to ensure safety and service delivery? If not, what changes would you support to our municipal finance model?

When cities are struggling, what is the appropriate way for the state to intervene? Should state intervention – through the emergency manager law or some other avenue – come with dollars attached? Why or why not?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the state’s response.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the federal government’s response.

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you believe Michigan’s tax system is generally fair? If not, what changes do you support?

Would you support the establishment of a Detroit Educational Commission that would have authority to site, open and close traditional public and charter schools?

What changes, if any, would you support in the way Michigan authorizes and regulates charter schools?

Do you favor amending the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity?

Do you support state-level laws modeled on the federal Restoration of Religious Freedom Act?

Have you signed any public pledge to support or oppose any organization’s public policy objectives, such as outlawing abortion or barring any increase in taxes?

Do you support legislation to minimize or eliminate the influence of political parties on drawing lines for legislative districts?

Do you support decriminalization of recreational marijuana?

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

Do you support the renewal and/or expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers?

Do we incarcerate too many people in Michigan? What would you change in the criminal justice system?

City of residence Northport
Age 39
Family Married to Jamie Scripps; sons Jack (5) and Nicol (nearly 2)
Education B.A., Alma College, 1998 J.D. with honors, University of Michigan Law School, 2005
Vehicles owned Ford C-Max Hybrid
Professional Experience Director - Institute for Energy Innovation, 2012-pres.; Senior Advisor for Energy Finance, Advanced Energy Economy, 2012-pres.; Senior Advisor, Michigan Energy Innovation Business Council, 2012-pres.; attorney, Latham & Watkins LLP, 2005-06 and 2011-12; Farmland Program Development Lead, Leelanau Conservancy, 2007-08
Political Experience State Representative - Michigan's 101st District, 2009-10; National Campaign Team, Bill Bradley for President, 1999-2000; Northern Michigan Regional Director, Michigan Democratic Coordinated Campaign, 2000; Campaign Manager, John Austin for Secretary of State, 1998; Campaign Manager, Nicol Stephen for Scottish Parliament, 1998-99
Race/ethnicity Caucasion
Campaign Website http://danscripps.com
Incumbent? false
Unfunded pension obligations are an issue that requires a cooperative approach between state and local governments and school districts. Part of the issue, particularly with local governments, is the state’s consistent failure to meet its revenue sharing obligations, which has shortchanged local governments. We need to address our pension obligations in a way that’s fair to taxpayers, local governments, and current and future retirees.
No. As a first step, we need to ensure the state is meeting both its constitutional and statutory revenue sharing obligations to local governments. In addition, I would look to how other states are addressing this issue, including North Carolina’s Local Government Commission, which has assisted local governments in that state in weathering the recent recession.
When the state replaces locally elected governments with state-appointed emergency managers, it bears responsibility to ensure success in both financial and human terms. Any actions need to improve financial sustainability and improve the lives of the residents most directly affected. Too often, however, the state’s approach has been focused exclusively on the balance sheet, with little regard for the people involved. We need a government that again puts people first.
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For over a year, Flint residents were forced to drink lead-poisoned water while the state did nothing. Even after GM switched water supplies because the water was too corrosive, even after the state brought in water for state employees, Flint residents were left to fend for themselves, while those who raised concerns were attacked and demeaned. We need to replace the lead pipes, and ensure Flint residents have access to full wrap-around services, including health care and educational supports. We must also recognize that other communities are facing infrastructure failures, and work to develop a truly comprehensive solution that meets the needs in Flint and other communities.
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EPA officials should have raised concerns and gone public when they were first made aware of the problems with Flint’s drinking water supplies. I credit our congressional delegation with pushing for federal funds to ensure safe drinking water and modernize Flint’s infrastructure. We need to make sure that other cities and smaller communities needing to replace their water and sewer infrastructure and address lead contamination have access to similar funds.
No.
No.
We need to push for greater fairness for Michigan’s middle class families. A disproportionate share of funding public services falls on families and individuals struggling just to get by. As a first step, I would work to fully restore the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit.
Yes. I fully support efforts to ensure local accountability for all schools receiving public funding. The failure to do so is a major missed opportunity by this legislature, and one that will hurt student achievement and hamper efforts to move Detroit – and Michigan – forward.
All schools receiving public funding – whether they’re charter schools or traditional public schools – need to be locally accountable and held to the same standards. Too many charter schools continue to siphon off public funding while failing to deliver improved educational outcomes, yet local communities have few options to improve or close these failing schools.
Yes. It’s simply wrong that in Michigan today a same sex couple can be married on a Saturday and denied housing or fired from their jobs on Monday, just because of who they are. We need to include all LGBTQ individuals under our state’s civil rights laws.
No. These laws are often little more than a license to discriminate.
No.
Yes. We need to restore the connection between public officials and the people and communities they were elected to represent.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes. Renewable energy is now the lowest-cost generation source, and we need to expand our use of renewable energy to rein in energy costs and address climate change. In addition, expanding the use of advanced energy – including renewable energy, energy efficiency, smart grid technologies, and advanced transportation – gives us the opportunity to reduce outages and increase reliability. In other words, we can create not just a cleaner grid, but a better one.
Yes. We need to look at the sentences other states impose for similar crimes in order to “right size” our sentencing guidelines to ensure public safety while saving taxpayer dollars.
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