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Michigan Representative District 29

Choose one candidate. Representatives in the Michigan State House serve two-year terms and receive an annual salary of $71,685.

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  • Candidate picture

    Tim Greimel
    (Dem)

  • Garren W. Griffith
    (Rep)

  • Artella Marie Leak
    (Grn)

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Biographical Information

How should the state assist other municipalities and school districts whose solvency is threatened by its financial obligations to current and future retirees?

Is the way the state funds our cities adequate to ensure safety and service delivery? If not, what changes would you support to our municipal finance model?

When cities are struggling, what is the appropriate way for the state to intervene? Should state intervention – through the emergency manager law or some other avenue – come with dollars attached? Why or why not?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the state’s response.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the federal government’s response.

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you believe Michigan’s tax system is generally fair? If not, what changes do you support?

Would you support the establishment of a Detroit Educational Commission that would have authority to site, open and close traditional public and charter schools?

What changes, if any, would you support in the way Michigan authorizes and regulates charter schools?

Do you favor amending the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity?

Do you support state-level laws modeled on the federal Restoration of Religious Freedom Act?

Have you signed any public pledge to support or oppose any organization’s public policy objectives, such as outlawing abortion or barring any increase in taxes?

Do you support legislation to minimize or eliminate the influence of political parties on drawing lines for legislative districts?

Do you support decriminalization of recreational marijuana?

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

Do you support the renewal and/or expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers?

Do we incarcerate too many people in Michigan? What would you change in the criminal justice system?

City of residence Auburn Hills, Michigan
Age 42
Education University of Michigan, Bachelor's in Economics and Political Science, Master's in Public Policy, and Doctor of Law
Vehicles owned 2016 Chevrolet Malibu
Professional Experience Civil Rights Attorney
Political Experience Rochester School Board member Oakland County Commissioner Michigan State Representative
Campaign Website http://timgreimel.com
Incumbent? true
The state could assist the local school districts by lowering the Michigan Public School Employee Retirement System cap to 0%. This would remove the current system where districts are receiving funding in their foundation allowance only to give it back for the unfunded liability. Additionally, it would level the playing field between charters and traditional public schools by taking away what is a significant (sometimes over $1,000 per pupil) disparity in our foundation funding system between charters and traditional school districts.
Recently, the Great Recession coupled with the underfunding of statutory revenue sharing have created budgetary pressures for municipalities. While municipalities receive two types of revenue sharing, constitutional and statutory, both have failed to provide adequate funding in recent years. Not only has statutory funding been insufficient, but a cap of 5% or the rate of inflation, whichever is lower, in taxable value adjustments all contribute to the crisis. Fully funding statutory revenue sharing, allowing municipalities to roll up millages when property tax revenue grows by less than the rate of inflation, and providing municipalities with more options to levy taxes can help address this
The emergency manager system’s only goal is to cut budgets to return to fiscal solvency, as I have seen in my district in the city of Pontiac. Oftentimes, these cuts often reduce public services and make living and working in these communities less attractive, which can further reduce revenues. Emergency managers have also proven to be ineffective and controversial. Allowing the state to assist the struggling municipality while attaching funding to state intervention could help reduce the necessity of service reductions. This could help to allow municipalities to remain attractive to residents and stem further reductions in their tax bases.
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The state government created this problem through its emergency manager and the Department of Environmental Quality, and the state has a responsibility to do what it can to fix things. Additional funds must be allocated to help the City of Flint and its children. This includes supplemental funding for special education and infrastructure, to help those who experienced the devastating effects of this crisis and to prevent future occurrences of catastrophes.
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While the EPA has begun the process of updating the Lead and Copper Rule, it could reduce the action level for lead and prohibit sampling practices which artificially lower lead levels in samples. For example, the practice of pre-flushing could be explicitly prohibited, as could using narrow neck sample bottles with tend to produce samples drawn at lower flow rates, which reduces lead levels within the sample. The Federal government could also provide more funding for repairs and updates to Flint's water infrastructure.
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Michigan's tax system needs vast improvements to become a "generally fair" system for all. Income tax receipts from individual taxpayers have dramatically increased, with the burden falling heavily on low- and middle-income families and seniors. At the same time, revenue collected from the business sector has increasingly declined. This is due to massive corporate tax cuts that are created at the expense of hard working families.
Yes, as part of the Detroit Public Schools plan that was passed by the Senate. A DEC was established as a mayorally appointed commission balanced between charter and traditional school interests. The DEC was to be empowered to have say on the siting and opening of schools (not closings) inside the footprint of the new community district, which encompassed the city of Detroit.
Although there are state laws in place for all schools in Michigan, the ultimate regulatory authority rests with the authorizer, who can rescind the charter for the school. Potential options to improve regulation of charters includes ensuring that the loopholes to avoid closure of charters are fully closed and remain closed. Additional options would be to place the power to authorize charters with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, or put into place penalties for authorizers, designated using a diffuse system, who do not adequately address their substandard charters.
Yes, LGBT individuals deserve the same protections as every other Michigander. I will continue to support legislative and citizen initiatives that seek to amend Elliott-Larsen to include the LGBT community.
No, state Religious Freedom Restoration Acts are not necessary and are often used as a statutory sword to discriminate against individuals in communities, like the LGBTQ community, that the proponents do not like.

Legislative proposals like Senate Bill 4 legalize discrimination and should not be enacted. Instead, the legislature should focus on ensuring all people are treated with dignity and respect regardless of their race, religion, or sexual orientation and making Michigan attractive to all individuals. Last session, I joined with my Democratic colleagues in voting no on a similar bill. Luckily, it was sent to the Senate where it died on the floor without a full vote.
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Yes, I support legislation that would minimize the influence of political parties in the reapportionment process. I support a non-partisan redistricting commission. While I believe a non-partisan redistricting commission could be achieved through a number of different scenarios, I strongly support legislation that has been introduced this session in the House that would achieve this goal – House Resolution 4800 (Moss) & House Joint Resolution AA (Hoadley). The bills and resolutions have not to this day been given committee hearings.
Currently, there are only two states that have fully legalized marijuana: Colorado and Washington. It is important to note that despite state legalization laws, marijuana is still illegal under federal law. The experience of these two states in the coming months will help me determine my final position to what extent recreational marijuana should be legislated.
I will support the Democratic Party's nominee for President of the United States, including the appearance at campaign events.
I support the expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers. I support the House Democrats' "Powering Michigan's Future" plan that was introduced in 2015. This includes House Bill 4518 which would increase renewable portfolio standards to 20% by 2022.
Our highest priority should be maintaining public safety. We should reduce long-term corrections spending by expanding our efforts to reduce crime. Specifically, we need to implement new strategies to reduce recidivism and reprioritize prisoner reentry programs to help prepare inmates to become productive members of society upon release. In addition, we should put resources into community-based and community-driven strategies that help individuals avoid a life of crime in the first place.
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