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Michigan Representative District 25

Choose one candidate. Representatives in the Michigan State House serve two-year terms and receive an annual salary of $71,685.

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  • Candidate picture

    Steve Naumovski
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Henry Yanez
    (Dem)

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Biographical Information

How should the state assist other municipalities and school districts whose solvency is threatened by its financial obligations to current and future retirees?

Is the way the state funds our cities adequate to ensure safety and service delivery? If not, what changes would you support to our municipal finance model?

When cities are struggling, what is the appropriate way for the state to intervene? Should state intervention – through the emergency manager law or some other avenue – come with dollars attached? Why or why not?

How would you rate the state’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the state’s response.

How would you rate the federal government’s response to the Flint water crisis?

Explain your answer and what you would do, if anything, to improve the federal government’s response.

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor? If so, explain.

Have you ever filed for personal bankruptcy? If so, explain.

Do you believe Michigan’s tax system is generally fair? If not, what changes do you support?

Would you support the establishment of a Detroit Educational Commission that would have authority to site, open and close traditional public and charter schools?

What changes, if any, would you support in the way Michigan authorizes and regulates charter schools?

Do you favor amending the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity?

Do you support state-level laws modeled on the federal Restoration of Religious Freedom Act?

Have you signed any public pledge to support or oppose any organization’s public policy objectives, such as outlawing abortion or barring any increase in taxes?

Do you support legislation to minimize or eliminate the influence of political parties on drawing lines for legislative districts?

Do you support decriminalization of recreational marijuana?

Do you support and will you appear at campaign events with your party’s presidential nominee?

Do you support the renewal and/or expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers?

Do we incarcerate too many people in Michigan? What would you change in the criminal justice system?

City of residence Sterling Heights
Age 60
Family Married, four children
Education Medical Doctor.
Vehicles owned Chrysler,GM, Chevrolet, SAAB, Jaguar
Professional Experience 32 years in the field of Medicine.
Political Experience Member and former Chairman of Ethnic Community Committee since 1999 ( new three year term expiring 2019). Councilman -City of Tetovo/Macedonia; Candidate for MP of Macedonia 2002, 2011, 2014, Senator of World Macedonian Congress and many other NGO's.
Race/ethnicity Ethnic Macedonian
Campaign Website http://www.ushs.us
Incumbent? false
The State should step up to the plate and use its resources that are available to create not only a resolution for this issue but to create precedent for future similar situations.
It is very complex issue. In some cases it is adequate while in some it is not. The model that I would support should include "ad hoc" available resources to intervene in situations where the funding appeared to be inadequate. The state should have the "the say so" for situations where these "as hoc" funds would be used to resolve issues but accountability should be the principle to follow these funds.
Again, it is very complex issue. In some cases it is appropriate for the state to intervene while in some it is not. In any situation we should not forget the legality of that intervention. The model that I would support should include "ad hoc" available resources to intervene in situations where the funding appeared to be inadequate, or the situation has evolved due to state or local government poor management. The state should have the "the say so" for situations where these "as hoc" funds would be used to resolve issues but accountability should be the principle to follow these funds.
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The state response was dependent of multiple factors ( local government non compliance with adapted building code, control and testing and lack of timely dealing with detected issues - (or not detected in timely fashion) because of nonperformance of city government employees /Flint/, EPA /federal agency-not addressing the issue in desired and required dynamics in order for the state to be involved more diligently and with desired dynamics required for these issue to be resolved timely and adequately. State has limited jurisdiction over these issues before they become crisis or leave the jurisdiction of the local government, this should be clearly defined along with the jurisdictions.
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EPA is a federal government's agency and it should have triggered the chain of jurisdictions, means and mechanisms to deal with the issue. Inaction of EPA and not performing its assigned jurisdictional actions allowed the issue to escalate to the level of crisis. Federal government acted slow and inadequate while rhetoric in the media was noting but political manipulation of the public opinion in service of party politics. Accountability of assigned jurisdictions is step one for this one.I would ask the State Senator and the Congressman from the affected district to step up to the plate in triggering that improved federal government response, while I would focus the state legislator.
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Yes, along with defining its jurisdictions and authority over the schools that receive state funds only and/or are approved by the state standards bored. This Commission should come up with comprehensive plan for action that will include every student and will ensure the teaching standards plus teachers financial status and improved position in the society ( as I have mentioned in my point on Education in general -improvement measures statewide.
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City of residence Sterling Heights
Age 58
Family Wife: Jane Children: Ryan, Alison, Cassidy, Natalie Grandson: Kellen Dog: Sadie
Education Associates Degree in Fire Science and General Studies
Vehicles owned Chevy Cruz, Buick LaCrosse, Ford Escape, Ford Fusion
Professional Experience Firefighter/Paramedic for the City of Sterling Heights
Political Experience 2 term State Representative of MI 25th district. Former Democratic Party chairperson of the 10th MI Congressional District
Race/ethnicity Hispanic
Campaign Website http://votehenryyanez.com
Incumbent? true
The state could assist the local school districts by lowering the MPSERS cap to 0%. This would remove the current system where districts are receiving funding in their foundation allowance only to give it back for the unfunded liability. Additionally, it would level the playing field between charters and traditional public schools by taking away what is a significant (sometimes over $1,000 per pupil) disparity in our foundation funding system between charters and traditional school districts. This leveling of the playing field would also turn into "found" money for the system, repurposing some of the dollars that were not available through the clawback system for the unfunded liability.
The state's current system of municipal finance has been inadequate to meet the needs of local units. Statutory revenue sharing was intended to be funded by 21.3% of the 4% sales tax collections. Since 2001, the state has underfunded revenue sharing by $6.2 billion. The state needs to fully fund statutory revenue sharing and enable municipalities more flexibility in generating revenue.
I strongly oppose the emergency manager law. The EM law has proven a failed policy as evidenced by the ballooning debt in DPS and the crisis in Flint. Programs like EVIP, also proved to be a failure. One size fits all, top down approaches have proven not to work. Municipalities already suffering from declining property values, the erosion of our manufacturing base, a deep structural recession, and a declining population were hit extra hard when the Governor and Republican legislature cut revenue sharing. The state needs to increase its statutory revenue sharing to municipalities so that they can provide the services necessary to attract and retain residents.
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Unfortunately, while residents of Flint expressed concerns over the safety, taste, color and smell of tap water almost immediately after the source switch occurred, the state was very slow to acknowledge the Flint Water Crisis. The state should be providing in the community large water tankers to ensure that all residents have access to clean water. The state should also provide full coverage for residents water bills for the time the cleanliness of the water is in question. We must also invest more resources in wrap around services, early childhood education programs, health care services, and lead line replacement.
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While the EPA has begun the process of updating the Lead and Copper Rule, it could reduce the action level for lead and prohibit sampling practices which artificially lower lead levels in samples. For example, the practice of pre-flushing could be explicitly prohibited, as could using narrow neck sample bottles with tend to produce samples drawn at lower flow rates, which reduces lead levels within the sample. The Federal government could also provide more funding for repairs and updates to Flint's water infrastructure.
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No. Lower and middle-income taxpayers pay a disproportionately higher amount of state taxes, than top income earners, relative to their income. I support an increase in the Corporate Income Tax and implementation of a graduated income tax that will put more discretionary income in the pockets of working and middle class families. Consumer spending represents roughly 70% of our economy. Putting more money in the pockets of working and middle class families will not only improve their individual circumstances, but will stimulate economic growth, which will benefit everyone.
I do support the creation of a Detroit Educational Commission (DEC). A commission would help restore local control to what has been proposed as the new Detroit Community Districts. Local government is most responsive and effective to the needs of its people. Currently, the State Reform/Redesign officer has the authority to open and close schools based on performance. This power should be transferred to a proposed DEC.
There should be a level playing field between how charter schools and public schools are regulated. Charter schools that underperform should be subject to the same level of scrutiny as public schools and loopholes that exist in current law to keep substandard charter schools open, should be closed. Charter schools should also be subject to the same levels of transparency and financial accountability as public schools. Authorization of charter schools should be contingent on to whether these schools provide adequate public transportation and whether they provide adequate special education programming.
Yes, LGBT individuals deserve the same protections as every other Michigander. I will continue to support legislative and citizen initiatives that seek to amend Elliott-Larsen to include the LGBT community
No, state Religious Freedom Restoration Acts (RFRA) are not necessary and are often used as a statutory sword to discriminate against individuals in communities, like the LGBTQ community, that the proponents do not like. Religious freedom is already protected under both the Federal and Michigan Constitutions. Enactment of RFRA will ultimately lead to additional litigation and force courts to attempt to interpret religious texts, which would create a dangerous precedent.
I have not signed any public pledges. As state representative, I took an oath to uphold the laws of the state and to serve the people of the state of Michigan, not any particular interest group or organization otherwise.
Yes, I support legislation that would minimize the influence of political parties in the reapportionment process. I support a non-partisan redistricting commission. Districts should be drawn and seats should be awarded to maximize proportionality to reflect the will of the voters. The results of gerrymandering are not only unrepresentative, but they lead to non-competitive elections, unresponsive politicians, polarization of both elected officials and the general populace, and a toxic, fractious relationship between members of both parties.
I would like to review the laws in place out in Colorado and Washington to ensure they are the right fit here in Michigan. However, any change we make in our marijuana law must be done with the assurance of the public safety of all communities around Michigan.
I will support our party's eventual nominee and will help to elect a Democrat to the presidency in November.
I strongly support the renewal and expansion of renewable energy mandates for Michigan energy producers. Furthermore, I have consistently opposed legislation that would dilute renewable portfolio standards that would allow energy producers to count burning solid waste, such as tires, as a renewable energy source. I believe Michigan can reach the goal of 30% renewable energy by 2030. Raising the renewable energy standard will not only reduce our dependence on foreign sources of fuel and reduce the negative environmental impact of burning fossil fuels, but it will also fuel creativity, entrepreneurship, and industry in the state of Michigan.
We not only have to be tough on crime, but smart, and fiscally responsible. We also must take the politics out of incarceration. For the last 30 years, our corrections budget and levels of incarceration have swollen to the point of instability. We must reevaluate whether incarceration is necessary for non-violent offenders, and those who are medically frail. We must also continue to invest in drug and alcohol treatment courts and veterans courts, which have shown a high success rate in reducing recidivism and are less costly. We should invest more in programs that rehabilitate offenders, reduce recidivism, and provide them the tools to be productive members of society.

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